James Dyson Award: A Global Call for Problem Solvers

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In Johor, more than 750 Dyson engineers work with their counterparts in the UK to develop Dyson’s pipeline of technology

The James Dyson Foundation held an event to launch the James Dyson Award (JDA) in Malaysia aiming to inspire young engineers and inventors to come up with solutions to real world problems. The event took place at Glasshouse Kuala Lumpur where partners and university professors attended to hear from Dyson engineers and the 2017 national JDA winner on the competition.

Awarded by the James Dyson Foundation, the international design award celebrates and inspires the next generation of design engineers. The award (which runs in 27 countries) aims to give young engineers and inventors a platform to take their creations from concept to reality while giving them international exposure.

An aspiring young engineer with her invention at the James Dyson Award (JDA) in Malaysia

Design something which solves a problem, big or small. The winner will gain international exposure through the competition and £30,000 (about RM 158,150.00) prize money to develop their idea.

James Dyson says: “Young engineers and designers have perspective and unbridled intelligence that makes them incredibly adept at problem solving. Their ideas can easily be dismissed, but if nurtured and celebrated they are transformative. Developing a product or technology is a long and daunting process; the James Dyson Award celebrates the inventive young people embarking on that process”.

The competition is simple; design something that solves a problem. This problem may be a frustration we all face in daily life, or a global issue such as world hunger. The important thing is that the solution is an effective and well-thought through solution.
There is an international prize of £30,000 and £5,000 for their university and £5,000 for two international runners up and each national winner receives £2,000.
Entries are first judged at the national level – before progressing to the international stage. A panel of Dyson engineers selects an international shortlist of 20 entries. The Top 20 projects are then reviewed by Sir James Dyson, who selects the international winner.

The James Dyson Award runs in 27 countries and regions worldwide. The deadline is midnight GMT on 20th July 2018 and candidates enter through an online application via the James Dyson Award website – https://www.jamesdysonaward.org/. Entrants should concisely explain what their invention is, how it works, and their development process. The best entries are always realistic and sustainable, show iterative development, solve a real problem and tell a story.
Entrants should submit imagery to support their application. The best entrants should be able to show evidence of physical prototyping as well as sketches and CAD.

Eligibility criteria is that entrants must be, or have been within the last four years, enrolled for at least one semester in an undergraduate or graduate engineering or design programme at a university in a country or region chosen to participate in the James Dyson Award.

In the case of team entries, all members of the team must be, or have been within the last four years, enrolled for at least one semester in an undergraduate or graduate programme at a university in a country or region chosen to participate in the James Dyson Award. One will need to be nominated and registered as the team member.

Founded in 2002, the James Dyson Foundation (JDF) a Dyson’s charity, exists to inspire future engineers by supporting education initiatives from primary school through to university. In Johor, more than 750 Dyson engineers work with their counterparts in the UK to develop Dyson’s pipeline of technology. In their spare time, these engineers represent the Foundation and head out to universities and local schools to conduct engineering workshops and technical talks, as well as STEM workshops at local schools to inspire the next generation of inventors